The RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 DNA Project

The Rationale and Goals of this Project

We suspect that virtually all the American members of this RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 DNA Project descend from the immigrant John1 RATHBONE of Block Island, Rhode Island, who was baptized 28Mar1629 at Farnworth Chapelry, Prescot, Lancashire, in England. However, the RATHBONE ancestries of a number of members, some of which begin with other surnames due to an NPE (Non-Paternity Event) having occurred in their tree, cannot yet be connected up to the main tree of descent from John1. What we do know for sure is that all of the members, by virtue of the FTDNA 37-marker Y-Chromosome DNA test they’ve sponsored, either for themselves (if male) or for a male relative, belong to this same RATHBONE patrilineage, which is by far the predominant one in the US.

Although membership in this project is restricted to active RATHBONE genealogists whose yDNA haplotypes match the RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 pattern, this is essentially a public collaborative genealogical project that aims to gather together all the best research and the best researchers of this patrilineage to reconstruct as completely and accurately as possible the patrilineal tree in which the American immigrant John1 is a key node. The twin goals of this project are to better establish the validity of the extensive work that has been done by other researchers on this tree, and where indicated, make corrections; and the other is to connect up to this tree as many of the project members as possible who haven't yet been able to determine where they fit in.

Pursuing this second goal (linking up the ancestral pedigrees of still unconnected members) is going to require additional research of the difficult kind typically faced by American genealogists who seek to extend their ancestries more than a generation back before the first every-name USCensus of 1850—additional research and luck, because there are many gaps in the records, especially where NPEs are involved. And we can expect many of these. Even though there’s typically just a 2-3% chance of an NPE occurring in any given generation, the chances are cumulative down the generations, and for modern descendants of the immigrant John1, who goes back some 12 generations, we can expect that about a quarter of his patrilineal progeny will have other surnames.

Building on the Existing RATHBONE Research

Accomplishing the first goal (building a more convincing evidential foundation for research already done) should be in most cases relatively routine for this predominantly New England based lineage, thanks to the ready (online) availability of vital records that go back to the very beginnings of most New England villages. On the other hand, to do the job right, with adequate comprehensiveness, is going to be a considerable labor that would hardly be practicable without the reasonably comprehensive and presumably solid foundation bequeathed to us by earlier researchers.

Both the descendancy and the ancestry of the immigrant John1 of Block Island have been very extensively and competently researched, and the conclusions of that research presented in the Rathbun, Rathbone, Rathburn Family Historian (RRR, published 1981-1996), by its founders and principal contributors Frank H. Rathbun, and my own closest RATHBONE cousin, Rob Rathbun. This journal has also been every-name indexed, and both the issues themselves and the index have been generously placed online here by Michael Rathbun.

There are two other published RATHBONE secondary sources worth noting. The first is a predecessor journal, called just The RATHBONE Family Historian (RFH), published from Jan1892-Jun1894), which was scanned and put online here (also at Michael’s site) by Rob Rathbun, the principal resarcher of RRR. The other, and much more important secondary source is the notorious (because riddled with errors) 19th century RATHBONE Genealogy: A Complete History of the RATHBONE Family, from 1574 to date, by John C. Cooley (SyracuseNY, 1898).

Cooley’s book is a typical 19th century genealogical compilation put together mostly by sending out queries to living RATHBONEs about their family histories, and its quality is largely a function of their responses. Since people generally know who their siblings, parents, aunts and uncles, and grandparents were, most of the material in Cooley covering the 19th century ought to be at least as accurate as the typical newspaper obituary—which is to say that a few errors due to misunderstandings and mistranscriptions can be expected, though in the main the material should be reasonably accurate. And even where it is not, the indexed every-name USCensus that begin in 1850 provides a ready check on what appears in the book. However, specific knowledge of the ancestors of Cooley’s informants more remote than their grandparents cannot be relied on, since few genealogists then, or for that matter now, have much understanding of how comprehensive their research needs to be, or how to do exhaustive research in the relevant public records.

The extensive RATHBONE lineages published in RRR are a different story altogether, because both of its principal researchers were accomplished genealogists, and they not only did a competent job researching the earlier generations themselves, but also seem to have maintained high standards of sifting through the submissions they elicited from individual contributors of their more recent RATHBONE ancestries. At least that is my impression based on the overlap with my own primary records RATHBONE research.

Where RRR falls short is in its failure to cite or even identify the evidence backing its conclusions, or therefore to provide needful analytical discussion of that evidence—all of which have since become de rigueur for genealogists who seek to satisfy modern scholarly standards and have their work taken seriously by other accomplished genealogists. Of course, given the financial and time constraints on creating and publishing a not for profit journal like RRR, these omissions are wholly understandable.

The Genealogical Content we Aim to Publish Here

As noted above, it is one of the two principal goals of the RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 Project to build on, amplify, and where necessary correct RRR in just this matter of the evidence. Only thus can we be fully confident that all the relevant evidence has been considered and the most plausible conclusions drawn from it. I hope to work on this myself as time permits, and to publish my findings as a series of analytical papers that begin with John1 and his conjugal family, though the time I can devote to unpaid research is limited and I’m hoping that others will be able to assist me, or work in parallel, so that we can make some real progress on this endeavor.

The bare conclusions of both types of research, on both the early generations and the recent lineages of all the members (each acting as “principal genealogist” representing his/her particular line), will be posted in indented tree form on an accompanying RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 Descendancies page, along with references (links and/or citations) to supporting evidence or to the publications, or for unpublished work the researchers, who’ve contributed to those conclusions. Initially, pending the new research I have in mind respecting the lineages published in RRR, I will at least be appending citations to RRR, or to Cooley, for each posted RATHBONE patriarch in the ancestral chain whose conjugal family is covered by these secondary sources. Thus, the Descendancies page (which will of course be CTL-F searchable) will itself be an index to the best current research on the indicated families.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY OF PUBLISHED SOURCES for RATHBONE Patrilineage 1

See “Building on the Existing RATHBONE Research” above, for commentary on these major sources:

John C. COOLEY
      RATHBONE Genealogy: A Complete History of the RATHBONE Family, from 1574 to date
            (SyracuseNY, 1898).

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RFH
      The RATHBONE Family Historian (Jan1892-Jun1894).

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RRR
      Rathbun, Rathbone, Rathburn Family Historian, ed. Frank H. Rathbun (1981-1996).

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This project is in no way affiliated with the DNA testing company Family Tree DNA or any of its surname projects.

The RATHBONE Surname and it's Phonetic Variants

The generic surname RATHBONE (in all caps) is meant to stand in these pages for all the alternate spellings of this British surname, whose spelling was standardized there as “Rathbone” some centuries ago. “Rathbone” was also the primary spelling of the American founder of RATHBONE Patrilineage 1, the immigrant John1 RATHBONE of Block Island, RI. As it happens, “Rathbun” is the most common spelling of the surname in America, and there are a few “Rathburn”s and other spellings as well. Rayburn, on the other hand, is of a wholly different derivation.

Before the early 1800s, when Webster’s Dictionary popularized the idea of a single “correct” spelling for every word, all but the most literate Americans spelled words phonetically, the way they heard them, and even literate men were known to spell their own surname differently at different times.

The rule here will be that all two syllable surnames of the form “Rathb___” with an “n” as the final consonant sound will be spelled RATHBONE when referred to generically, but where the reference is to specific records (or to specific modern individuals), the spelling will be exactly as it appears in those records, and in the usual upper/lower case format.

To Join this RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 Project

This project has several qualifications for membership. If you are interested in becoming a member, please read through the following text and contact me by clicking the “Email JBR” button at the top right of this page if you believe you qualify.

First, membership is open only to active genealogists who have taken or sponsored a Y-Chromosome (ySTR) DNA test of a male surnamed RATHBONE on a sufficient number of markers to show that his haplotype broadly matches the Root Prototype Haplotype, as shown in the haplotype chart for this project. At present, only the 37-marker test offered by the testing company, Family Tree DNA, is unequivocally adequate for definitive patrilineage classification, but those who’ve tested their Y-Chromosome at Ancestry.com and who fit the RPH more loosely may be able to upgrade to 37 markers or otherwise qualify for a definitive classification: if you are in this boat, please contact me and I’ll be glad to evaluate your Ancestry yDNA results for you, though I’ll probably recommend upgrading.

Those who haven’t yet tested the Y-Chromosome of a male surnamed RATHBONE, but who believe, on purely genealogical grounds, that their RATHBONE ancestry fits within this patrilineage, can order a qualifying 37-marker Y-Chromosome (ySTR) DNA test directly from Family Tree DNA. Except for when one of FTDNA’s occasional sales is going on, the best price for this test ($149) can be obtained by ordering a test while joining one of the FTDNA surname projects. For example, one could apply to join the FTDNA RATHBONE surname project, and place the test order on acceptance. Please note: this RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 Project has no affiliation with FTDNA and membership in the FTDNA Surname project is not required for membership in this independent patrilineage project.

The other qualification for membership in this project is a willingness to share for posting to the project web pages both the specific results of your test, and an ancestral RATHBONE pedigree derived from your research, backed by your name as principal genealogist for your line, and by an email address, so that you can be contacted for further sharing by other project members—or, for that matter, by other interested genealogists who come across the project pages on the web, and find something that resonates with their own lineage.

The RATHBONE ancestral pedigree that I’ll ask you to submit if your yDNA test results match the pattern for this patrilineage, should show each generation back from the person tested to the earliest RATHBONE ancestor for whom you have convincing documentary evidence. The specifics of what’s needed are explained in the head note to the Descendancies section of this project, though the specific format doesn’t matter since I’ll have to hand code it into HTML anyway, for posting. I’ll also encourage you to provide copies of, or links to, the few pieces of evidence (other than the USCensus) that you’re likely to have for your most problematic ancestral generation—usually the earliest.

As a professional genealogist, I’ll then take a close look at your submitted pedigree, and do some validating research myself to ensure that what’s posted is well-founded. There’s all too much genealogical flotsam and jetsam floating around the internet and it is our objective in this project to confine what we post strictly to what is evidence based. I will also try to come up with recommendations for additional research you might undertake to strengthen your pedigree or push it farther back, at least to the point where it converges with one of the established branches of this patrilineage.

This is meant to be a project for active researchers with a keen interest in their RATHBONE lineage, and once you’re a member, and thus known to have a patrilineal connection with all the other members, you are encouraged to contact any whose lineages offer special promise of converging with yours, and perhaps to organize collaborative research undertakings with them. You can contact a principal genealogist member by clicking on their full name in the project Directory of Researchers.

You may also be able to identify and recruit potential new members for testing who might be distant cousins of yours—patrilineal descendants whose ancestors trod approximately the same ground at about the same time as your ancestors. However, there’s little or nothing to be gained by testing known close cousins, for the simple reason that their genealogical connections are already known.

On the DNA side, this RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 project is a large one with many members who’ve extended their 37-marker test results to the full 111 markers offered by FTDNA, and it may prove genealogically valuable for you to do likewise. The more markers that are tested, the more chances you have of turning up mutations that you have in common with certain other members, and in most cases where this happens, just the DNA alone can classify you as belonging, with them, to a Closer Cousin Cluster (CCC), a particular family sub-branch within the patrilineage. Knowing your CCC can focus your attention onto the genealogical byways most likely to yield the evidence you need to confirm and/or connect your pedigree to one of the larger and deeper indented trees. As project coordinator, and a yDNA expert, I’ll be available to advise you about these further implications and possibilities regarding your DNA and your closer patrilineage cousins.

Finally, if you would like to join the project as the principal genealogist representative of your particular RATHBONE ancestry, but are a female, or a male whose surname isn’t RATHBONE, you will have to find a RATHBONE male to test for you, as your surrogate. The only things your surrogate need do are to: (1) agree to service the cheek swab kit that will be mailed out to him and drop it in the mail; and (2) consent to your use of his yDNA results haplotype for the genealogical purposes of this project. Ordinarily, we would also want to identify him by name to preclude confusion with others with the same name, but if desired, his name can remain anonymous. In any case, your (and your male cousin’s) posted ancestral pedigree will post only the names for ancestors born after 1900.

As for your yDNA test results (haplotype) that I’ll analyze for you and post, since it’s a product of sampling portions of the Y-Chromosome that have no known genetic function, the only meaning to be derived from the set of 37 two digit numbers (markers) that make it up, is that the person tested belongs to a patrilineage whose common ancestor lived, in most cases, many hundreds of years ago.

There have been a couple of sensationalized reports of misguided law enforcement officials mining public genealogical databases for aid in tracking down criminal suspects or fugitives, but even the most extended 111-marker Y-Chromosome (ySTR) DNA haplotypes fall far short, not only of being able to establish particular identities, they don’t even provide more than weak probabilistic evidence that the suspect in question has any sort of close relationship to the person tested: even with perfectly matching 111-marker haplotypes, any two members of the patrilineage, say a criminal suspect and an innocent project member, might just as well be 6th cousins, say, as brothers, or father and son. Thus, even in the unlikely event that you might be related through your patriline to a “person of interest” to the authorities, ordinary conventional methods, such as querying the many ordinary online databases that have been compiled on all of us, are going to be far more effective in tracking down particular individuals.

On the other hand, what yDNA testing can show definitively is that a male who is ostensibly the descendant of a line of JONESes, is not, in fact a JONES of this line all the way back, because somewhere up the ancestral tree a Non-Paternity Event (NPE) must have occurred, causing a divergence between the surname line and the biological line. There’s no telling just from this one yDNA test where the divergence occurred, though by testing a number of other ostensible descendants of this line, one could in principle narrow down the possibilities to just a few generations. Even so, because these yDNA tests are not in themselves paternity tests, extensive genealogical research, and a plentiful helping of luck, is usually required to identify the generation in which the NPE occurred, as such events typically leave little or no paper trail.

Discoveries of this kind can certainly be unsettling, not so much for the person tested, as for the genealogist who has invested a lot of time developing his supposed ancestral line. But such discoveries, or at least suspicions, are routinely developed through genealogical research alone. yDNA testing in such cases can actually be valuable for their ability to resolve uncertaintites one way or the other.

Besides, if there’s one thing that all real genealogists have in common, it’s the open-mindedness to follow the truth wherever it may lead. And speaking of leads, if the male JONES who was tested turns out to be a match to one or more SMITHs (in addition to, or instead of to other JONESes) the need to review one’s research for possible convergence between known JONESes and SMITHs (perhaps as neighbors, or having intrafamilial dealings) can open up new leads or avenues of investigation.


RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 ySTR DNA Haplotypes Compared

The following matrices, one for 37-marker comparisons, and one for 111-marker comparisons (for those project members who have extended to 111) provide some idea of the closeness of relationship across the full set of tested members of this patrilineage. The cell at the intersection of each column/row pair shows the GD (Genetic Distance) between the pair—this is an imperfect count of the total number of mutations that have occurred in both lines of descent since their MRCPA (Most Recent Common Patrilineal Ancestor) walked the earth.

It’s also possible to create corresponding matrices that show TMRCA (Time back to the MRCA, expressed either in generations or in years), but I’ve decided to forgo such charts because they are just too misleading as indicators of when a particular MRCA lived. Mutations are so sporadic and infrequent (even when a large number of markers is tested) that such estimates can easily be off by many hundreds of years. If one has the irresistable urge to play around with TMRCA estimates between particular haplotype pairs, the best way to indulge it is to run the FTDNA Tip calculator for that pair from one’s personal page—but be sure to input the number of generations for which one knows, genealogically, the bearers of these haplotypes cannot have had a common ancestor.

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37-Marker Haplotype Genetic Distance Comparison Matrix

Genetic Distances, RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 37-marker yDNA Matrices

The ID is the Principal Genealogist’s: Project# - Name [(and if applicable) = Name/SURNAME of other person tested],
         where omitted surnames are all RATHBONE (in various spellings), and other surnames are rendered in all-caps.

Color-coding shows whether a haplotype pair Definitely, Probably, or just Possibly belongs to the patrilineage.

The number in each cell is roughly the number of divergent mutations between each pair of haplotypes.

The lowest numbers are suggestive of the closest relationships, but any one pairwise number can be off by 1 or 2 either way.

Member GDs are loosely grouped by their haplotype affinities, creating suggestive clusters of low numbers in the matrix.

If the inclusion of some project members in this patrilineage seems doubtful, considering their full array of GDs,
         note that this is only a tiny and perhaps unrepresentative sample of all surviving patrilineage members, some of whom may have closer GDs.

Also, these GDs don’t take account either of the common surname that most of these haplotypes share, or of the possible convergence of their genealogical
         narratives at a particular time and place; and where either of these conditions obtain, 1, 2, or 3 can reasonably be subtracted from the indicated GD.

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111-Marker Haplotype Genetic Distance Comparison Matrix for RATHBONE Patrilineage 1

Genetic Distances, RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 67-marker yDNA Matrices

The ID is the Principal Genealogist’s: Project# - Name [(and if applicable) = Name/SURNAME of other person tested],
         where omitted surnames are all RATHBONE (in various spellings), and other surnames are rendered in all-caps.

Color-coding shows whether a haplotype pair Definitely, Probably, or just Possibly belongs to the patrilineage.

The number in each cell is roughly the number of divergent mutations between each pair of haplotypes.

The lowest numbers are suggestive of the closest relationships, but any one pairwise number can be off by 1 or 2 either way.

Member GDs are loosely grouped by their haplotype affinities, creating suggestive clusters of low numbers in the matrix.

If the inclusion of some project members in this patrilineage seems doubtful, considering their full array of GDs,
         note that this is only a tiny and perhaps unrepresentative sample of all surviving patrilineage members, some of whom may have closer GDs.

Also, these GDs don’t take account either of the common surname that most of these haplotypes share, or of the possible convergence of their genealogical
         narratives at a particular time and place; and where either of these conditions obtain, 1, 2, or 3 can reasonably be subtracted from the indicated GD.


RATHBONE Patrilineage 1 yDNA (ySTR) Haplotypes

The chart below shows the haplotypes for each tested project member of this patrilineage. The colored marker value boxes are the ones that have mutated. I’ve decapitated most of the marker header names (e.g. “DYS393” has been truncated to just “393”), and color coded them to indicate mutability. Thus, [DYS]439 is a fast mutator, [DYS]458 is faster still, and CDYa&b are blazing, while [DYS]393 is slow and rarely mutates. The remaining markers fall into the midrange of mutability.

The mutability of individual markers is important because it’s the shared inherited mutations that identify the Closer Cousin Clusters which it’s the main purpose of testing to ascertain. And when shared mutations are to faster mutators, there’s a fair chance that some may have mutated independently in different lines, and thus weren’t inherited from a common ancestor.

Haplotype Identifiers FTDNA 37-Marker Panel FTDNA Markers 38-67 FTDNA Markers 68-111 Haplotype Identifiers
Project
Member
#
 Principal Genealogist



(RATHBONE surnames omitted)
Earliest Known Patrilineal Ancestor
(BIRTH date place — DEATH date place)
c=circa; s=say
OR
Descent from John1
(RATHBONE surnames omitted)
3
9
3
3
9
0
1
9
/
3
9
4
3
9
1
3
8
5
a
3
8
5
b
4
2
6
3
8
8
4
3
9
3
8
9
I
3
9
2
3
8
9
I
I
4
5
8
4
5
9
a
4
5
9
b
4
5
5
4
5
4
4
4
7
4
3
7
4
4
8
4
4
9
4
6
4
a
4
6
4
b
4
6
4
c
4
6
4
d
4
6
0
Y
G
-
H
4
Y
C
A
I
I
a
Y
C
A
I
I
b
4
5
6
6
0
7
5
7
6
5
7
0
C
D
Y
a
C
D
Y
b
4
4
2
4
3
8
5
3
1
5
7
8
3
9
5
S
1
a
3
9
5
S
1
b
5
9
0
5
3
7
6
4
1
4
7
2
4
0
6
S
1
5
1
1
4
2
5
4
1
3
a
4
1
3
b
5
5
7
5
9
4
4
3
6
4
9
0
5
3
4
4
5
0
4
4
4
4
8
1
5
2
0
4
4
6
6
1
7
5
6
8
4
8
7
5
7
2
6
4
0
4
9
2
5
6
5
7
1
0
4
8
5
6
3
2
4
9
5
5
4
0
7
1
4
7
1
6
7
1
7
5
0
5
5
5
6
5
4
9
5
8
9
5
2
2
4
9
4
5
3
3
6
3
6
5
7
5
6
3
8
4
6
2
4
5
2
4
4
5
Y
G
-
A
1
0
4
6
3
4
4
1
Y
G
-
1
B
0
7
5
2
5
7
1
2
5
9
3
6
5
0
5
3
2
7
1
5
5
0
4
5
1
3
5
6
1
5
5
2
7
2
6
6
3
5
5
8
7
6
4
3
4
9
7
5
1
0
4
3
4
4
6
1
4
3
5

Proj
#


 Principal
 Genealogist

(RATHBONE surnames omitted)
R-06  Gail>RichardDean Joseph2-Ben3-Ben4-Williams5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 30 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 28 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 R-06  Gail>RichardDean
R-01  JenniferG>DonaldH Joseph2-Ben3-Ben4-Williams5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 30 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 28 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-01  JenniferG>DonaldH
R-13  Gail>JohnAlbert Joseph2-Ben3-Simeon4-Rod5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 18 8 09 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 09 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 28 0 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 R-13  Gail>JohnAlbert
R-04  TimothyJohn Charles Henry (c1845 PA - 1886) 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 13 10 17 19 34 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 15 8 13 28 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-04  TimothyJohn
Root Prototype Haplotype 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11  RPH
R-14  RobertJoseph William2-Thomas3-Ebenezer4-Ebenezer5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-14  RobertJoseph
R-10  Tim>Scott Samuel2-John3-Thomas4-Thomas5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-10  Tim>Scott
R-12  Tim>JohnAlan Samuel2-Elijah3-Samuel4-Ben5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 12 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 10 14 22 16 11 10 20 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 19 10 12 11 R-12  Tim>JohnAlan
R-15  JerryEdward Thomas2-Thomas3-Thomas4-WalterC5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 14 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-15  JerryEdward
R-11  JackCecil John2-John3-John4-John5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 18 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 25 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-11  JackCecil
R-02  JesseEarl John2-John3-Edmund4-Gideon5 13 23 15 10 12 18 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 34 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-02  JesseEarl
R-07  DonaldLeRoy John2-John3-Jonathan4-Jonathan5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 17 34 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 19 10 24 18 13 14 25 12 2018 11 14 18 10 12 11 R-07  DonaldLeRoy
R-08  DavidEugene John2-John3-Jonathan4-Clark5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 17 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-08  DavidEugene
R-17  JamesRonald 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 17 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 36 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-17  JamesRonald
R-16  Deborah>Joseph Skelley 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 12 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 17 29 11 13 14 15 10 9 21 21 14 10 17 19 35 35 12 10 11 8 16 17 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21 21 17 10 12 12 16 8 13 27 20 11 15 12 13 10 11 12 11 29 15 8 15 11 26 27 19 11 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 10 11 12 30 11 14 22 16 11 10 21 15 20 10 24 18 13 14 26 12 20 18 12 14 18 10 12 11 R-16  Deborah>Joseph Skelley
R-03  RobertBoehm John2-Joshua3-Wait4-Wait5 13 23 15 10 12 17 11 15 13 13 11 29 19 8 9 11 11 26 14 18 30 11 13 14 15 10 8 21 21 14 10 17 20 35 35 12 10 13 11 12 30 11 14 22 17 11 R-03  RobertBoehm

The chart scrolls to the right to show tested markers beyond the first 37. A synthetic Root Prototype Haplotype (RPH) has been constructed to represent the most likely (unmutated) haplotype of the Most Recent Common Patriarchal Ancestor (MRCPA) of all the members of this project. In most cases the marker values of this RPH are those which are the most common across all of the haplotypes. Marker values that deviate from those of the RPH are deemed to be mutations, and are highlighted in lime green—or tomato, for multistep mutations. Markers with null values, due to deletions, are rendered in dark seagreen. Where the multicopy markers DYS464 and YCA (each taken as a whole) diverge in value from those of the RPH, the whole adjacent set of values will be colored yellow green, and will be counted as a single mutation. In the same way, reclOH mutations, which may affect several blocks of separated markers, will be colored orange and treated all as a single mutation when calculating Genetic Distance.

You may click on a highlighted Project Member # (like D-05 for member Alan) to see the posted pedigree for that particular test subject. Clicking on the name of the Principal Genealogist, like Alan RATHBONE brings up his entry in the Directory of Researchers, and clicking on his full name in the Directory brings up an email blank addressed to him. The Earliest Known Patrilineal Ancestor (and/or his data) is as projected by the editor (JBR), and may not reflect the opinion of the Principal Genealogist of that line.

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Last updated 18Mar2019
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